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Everything must change. 
Codis Quote: I wanted to be the man my father thought I could become. Events and incidents facilitated my growth beyond my wildest dreams. There were some things I learned by accident. Unlike in high school, I was paying attention. That's why the memories are etched in my mind. If I close my eyes and lean my head back in a chair, I can still see the streets of Unchon-ni. I can smell that pungent odor that seemed to permeate the air of the village as if I was standing there today."
The village of Unchon-ni has gone through significant changes since I was stationed at Camp Kaiser. This thriving village, which grew as a result of the US Army Brigades and Detachments established toward the end of the Korean Conflict is no longer there. The US army Military units housed at Camp Kaiser were transferred in 1970. Thus, the village lost it economic benefactor, essentially the reason for its existence. Camp Kaiser's grounds have been turned over to the Republic of Korea army and used as a training area. It sounds strange to say it, but there is no there for Unchon-ni in 2010.
However, my story is about the Unchon-ni I knew from April of 1962 through May of 1963, some forty-eight years ago. I arrived at the young naïve age of seventeen and left at a more mature age of eighteen. While there, I was stationed in the ultimate man's club, the United States Army. I served as a dog soldier assigned to Echo Company, 1st. Brigade, 17th. Infantry.  Most, if not all, of my leisure hours, were spent in a little village right outside the gate of Camp Kaiser, called Unchon-ni.   
 The more Civil Rights gains realized in the United States by such men as Martin Luther King’s Jr., and others.  It always initiated some sort of retaliation by a small number of southern bred white boys stationed at Camp Kaiser. The results were violent confrontations between those factors and our E Company Crew. See the excerpts on this page from the book, entitled Unchon-ni.

Everything must change. Codis Quote: I wanted to be the man my father thought I could become. Events and incidents facilitated my growth beyond my wildest dreams. There were some things I learned by accident. Unlike in high school, I was paying attention. That's why the memories are etched in my mind. If I close my eyes and lean my head back in a chair, I can still see the streets of Unchon-ni. I can smell that pungent odor that seemed to permeate the air of the village as if I was standing there today." The village of Unchon-ni has gone through significant changes since I was stationed at Camp Kaiser. This thriving village, which grew as a result of the US Army Brigades and Detachments established toward the end of the Korean Conflict is no longer there. The US army Military units housed at Camp Kaiser were transferred in 1970. Thus, the village lost it economic benefactor, essentially the reason for its existence. Camp Kaiser's grounds have been turned over to the Republic of Korea army and used as a training area. It sounds strange to say it, but there is no there for Unchon-ni in 2010. However, my story is about the Unchon-ni I knew from April of 1962 through May of 1963, some forty-eight years ago. I arrived at the young naïve age of seventeen and left at a more mature age of eighteen. While there, I was stationed in the ultimate man's club, the United States Army. I served as a dog soldier assigned to Echo Company, 1st. Brigade, 17th. Infantry. Most, if not all, of my leisure hours, were spent in a little village right outside the gate of Camp Kaiser, called Unchon-ni.
The more Civil Rights gains realized in the United States by such men as Martin Luther King’s Jr., and others. It always initiated some sort of retaliation by a small number of southern bred white boys stationed at Camp Kaiser. The results were violent confrontations between those factors and our E Company Crew. See the excerpts on this page from the book, entitled Unchon-ni.